1999
2000
2001
2002
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2018
1999

1999

We were on the eve of a new millennium, the 21st century, Y2K and across the world people would prepare to party like 1999 or were anxiously worrying about the millennium bug. Closer to home and The Scottish Parliament sat for the first time. Turning Point Scotland came into existence as an independent charity at the time of devolution in April 1999 when third sector organisations began to play a greater part in the delivery of public services.

Our origins date back to 1964 as part of a UK organisation called Helping Hands, which soon became known as Turning Point, providing services in substance misuse, mental health and learning disability.

In this year we launched our Dumfries and Galloway Learning Disability Services, Greyfriars Close Elgin, Rosie’s Café in Aberdeen and Link Up among others which all still operate.

2000

Let’s all meet up in the year 2000…

Turning Point Scotland initially had 180 staff and a turnover of less than £3million when it was set up as an independent charity and the first business plan set a target of £7million turnover by 2003/04.

Turning Point Scotland has always specialised in supporting people facing the most complex and challenging situations. Our ‘people centred’ ethos places the people we support first in our thinking and ensures that our staff convert their passion into great services. TPS delivers improvement in Scotland’s social care sector through high quality services, leadership and innovation.

We provide a diverse range of services including crisis intervention, housing support, care at home, community rehabilitation, social enterprises and residential care to eight different care groups. This is a unique position amongst Scottish Voluntary sector providers, as most tend to focus on one or two groups only.

We involve people we support as fully as possible in decisions about the support they receive which is essential in achieving positive outcomes, maximizing their independence and helping people to become full and active participants in their community. Their support needs include substance misuse, learning disability, mental health, homelessness, criminal justice, autism, early onset dementia and Huntington’s disease.

2001

2001

We were on the eve of a new millennium, the 21st century, Y2K and across the world people would prepare to party like 1999 or were anxiously worrying about the millennium bug. Closer to home and The Scottish Parliament sat for the first time. Turning Point Scotland came into existence as an independent charity at the time of devolution in April 1999 when third sector organisations began to play a greater part in the delivery of public services.

Our origins date back to 1964 as part of a UK organisation called Helping Hands, which soon became known as Turning Point, providing services in substance misuse, mental health and learning disability.

In this year we launched our Dumfries and Galloway Learning Disability Services, Greyfriars Close Elgin, Rosie’s Café in Aberdeen and Link Up among others which all still operate.

2002

Let’s all meet up in the year 2000…

Turning Point Scotland initially had 180 staff and a turnover of less than £3million when it was set up as an independent charity and the first business plan set a target of £7million turnover by 2003/04.

Turning Point Scotland has always specialised in supporting people facing the most complex and challenging situations. Our ‘people centred’ ethos places the people we support first in our thinking and ensures that our staff convert their passion into great services. TPS delivers improvement in Scotland’s social care sector through high quality services, leadership and innovation.

We provide a diverse range of services including crisis intervention, housing support, care at home, community rehabilitation, social enterprises and residential care to eight different care groups. This is a unique position amongst Scottish Voluntary sector providers, as most tend to focus on one or two groups only.

We involve people we support as fully as possible in decisions about the support they receive which is essential in achieving positive outcomes, maximizing their independence and helping people to become full and active participants in their community. Their support needs include substance misuse, learning disability, mental health, homelessness, criminal justice, autism, early onset dementia and Huntington’s disease.